ARCHIVOS DE LA SOCIEDAD ESPAÑOLA
DE OFTALMOLOGIA

N.º 8 - Agosto 2005


EDITORIAL

A RENEWED APPRECIATION FOR OCULAR IMMUNE PRIVILEGE

UNA NUEVA APRECIACIÓN DEL PRIVILEGIO OCULAR INMUNE

JERRY Y. NIEDERKORN, Ph.D


Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of blindness in the developed world and has been the topic of intense investigation in recent years. The pathogenesis of AMD is complex and involves a spectrum of genetic and environmental factors. Recently, three independent research teams have simultaneously identified a single nucleotide polymorphism in the genome that results in a three- to seven-fold increase in the risk of developing AMD (1-3). The polymorphism occurs in the gene that encodes complement factor H, a key regulator of the complement cascade and inflammation. The role of complement activation and inflammation in the pathogenesis of AMD was proposed over three years ago by Anderson et al (4) and fits neatly with the aforementioned reports indicating a strong association between polymorphism in the factor H gene and AMD. One of the hallmarks of AMD is the formation of drusen, which are insoluble deposits of proteinaceous molecules and cell debris that accumulate at the interface between Bruch’s membrane and the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Drusen contain a variety of inflammation-related proteins, including c-reactive protein, complement components (including the C5b-9 complex), and even immunoglobulin. The presence of c-reactive protein in drusen is particularly interesting, as it is an acute phase proinflammatory molecule that can directly activate the complement cascade. However, the deposition of the C5b-9 complement complex is inhibited by complement factor H. Thus, malfunction of complement factor H, due to a single nucleotide substitution, could affect the buffering effect of factor H on the complement cascade and culminate in chronic inflammation and AMD.

The complement system is a crucial component of both innate and adaptive immune responses. In addition to perforating the cell membranes of pathogens and producing osmotic lysis, complement activation products are potent chemoattractants and activators of inflammatory cells, especially neutrophils. Activation of the complement cascade is an important mechanism for controlling bacterial infections, but if unchecked, the complement system can inflict significant damage to normal host cells. Many mammalian tissues, including those in the eye, are protected from complement-mediated injury by complement regulatory proteins (CRP), which are expressed in the cell membranes and are also present in body fluids, such as the aqueous humor and vitreous of the eye. It has been proposed that low levels of complement activation are part of the normal homeostatic process for controlling minor bacterial infections and that CRP function to protect innocent bystander cells from complement-mediated injury under these conditions. In support of this hypothesis, Sohn and coworkers have shown that administration of an antibody that blocks one of the CRP - called cell surface regulator of complement (Crry) - results in severe anterior uveitis in rats (5). However, the uveitis that occurs in anti-Crry treated animals can be reversed by depleting systemic stores of complement with cobra venom factor. One might argue that disrupting the function of CRP through the administration of an antibody to a CRP (i.e., Crry), is analogous to the perturbation of complement regulation that occurs when the function of a key CRP, complement factor H, is altered by a single amino acid substitution. The strong association between factor H polymorphism and AMD suggests that tight regulation of the immune system in the eye is crucial for maintaining normal vision. This has important implications in the context of ocular immune privilege and its impact on the integrity of the visual axis.

The immune privilege of the eye is a widely recognized, but often misunderstood concept. Stated in its simplest terms, immune privilege is the condition in which immune processes are either excluded or significantly blunted in specific anatomic sites in the body. The anterior chamber of the eye is a time-honored example of an immune privileged site. The immune privilege of the anterior chamber of the eye was recognized almost 125 years ago when the Dutch scientist van Dooremaal noted the prolonged survival of human tumor cells and fetal cartilage grafts transplanted into the anterior chamber of the rabbit eye. Since then, numerous investigators have confirmed ocular immune privilege through the long term survival of histoincompatible tissue grafts placed into the anterior chamber of laboratory animals.

This year marks the 100th anniversary of the first successful human corneal transplant, which was performed before the human major histocompatibility complex was recognized and before corticosteroids were available to the ophthalmologist. In spite of these handicaps, corneal transplants have been enormously successful and are beneficiaries of ocular immune privilege.

The immune privilege of the eye is a compilation of anatomical, physiological, and immunological adaptations that collectively exclude, down regulate, neutralize, or eliminate immune effector elements that might damage ocular tissues, which have limited regenerative capacities. Although immune privilege was discovered through laboratory manipulations, its importance lies in its impact in protecting the eye from immune-mediated inflammation. Unlike other organs, which can tolerate inflammation and retain normal function, inflammation in the eye can have devastating consequences. In the final analysis, the eye has only one known function – to promote the unfettered transmission of light images to the retina and the delivery of neurological signals to the brain. The recent discovery that polymorphism of complement factor H is associated with AMD is further testament to the importance of immune privilege in the preservation of vision.

  

REFERENCES

  1. Klein RJ, Zeiss C, Chew EY, Tsai JY, Sackler RS, Haynes C, et al. Complement factor H polymorphism in age-related macular degeneration. Science 2005; 308: 385-389.

  2. Edwards AO, Ritter R 3rd, Abel KJ, Manning A, Panhuysen C, Farrer LA. Complement factor H polymorphism and age-related macular degeneration. Science 2005; 308: 421-424.

  3. Haines JL, Hauser MA, Schmidt S, Scott WK, Olson LM, Gallins P, et al. Complement factor H variant increases the risk of age-related macular degeneration. Science 2005; 308: 419-421.

  4. Anderson DH, Mullins RF, Hageman GS, Johnson LV. A role for local inflammation in the formation of drusen in the aging eye. Am J Ophthalmol 2002; 134: 411-431.

  5. Sohn JH, Kaplan HJ, Suk HJ, Bora PS, Bora NS. Chronic low level complement activation within the eye is controlled by intraocular complement regulatory proteins. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2000; 41: 3492-3502.

  


  

A RENEWED APPRECIATION FOR OCULAR IMMUNE PRIVILEGE

UNA NUEVA APRECIACIÓN DEL PRIVILEGIO OCULAR INMUNE

JERRY Y. NIEDERKORN, Ph.D


La degeneración macular asociada a la edad (DMAE) es una de las principales causas de ceguera en el mundo desarrollado y ha sido objeto de intensa investigación en los últimos años. La patogenia de la DMAE es compleja e implica un espectro de factores genéticos y ambientales. Recientemente, tres grupos de investigación han identificado simultáneamente un polimorfismo de un solo nucleótido en el genoma que provoca un aumento de tres a siete veces en el riesgo de desarrollar DMAE (1-3). El polimorfismo tiene lugar en el gen que codifica el factor H del complemento, un regulador clave de la cascada del complemento y de la inflamación. El papel de la activación del complemento y de la inflamación en la patogenia de la DMAE fue propuesto hace más de tres años por Anderson et al. (4) y concuerda claramente con los informes antes mencionados indicando una fuerte asociación entre el polimorfismo en el gen del factor H y la DMAE. Una de las características distintivas de la DMAE es la formación de drusas, depósitos insolubles de moléculas proteináceas y desechos celulares que se acumulan en la interfase entre la membrana de Bruch y el epitelio pigmentario de la retina (EPR). Las drusas contienen varias proteínas relacionadas con la inflamación, incluida la proteína C-reactiva, componentes del complemento (incluido el complejo C5b-9) e incluso inmunoglobulina. La presencia de proteína C-reactiva en las drusas es particularmente interesante, ya que es una molécula proinflamatoria de fase aguda que puede activar directamente la cascada del complemento. Sin embargo, el depósito del complejo C5b-9 del complemento se ve inhibido por el factor H del complemento. Por tanto, un mal funcionamiento del factor H, debido a una sustitución de un solo nucleótido, podría afectar al efecto barrera del factor H en la cascada del complemento y desembocar en inflamación crónica y DMAE.

El sistema del complemento es un componente crucial en las respuestas inmunes tanto innata como adquirida. Además de perforar las membranas celulares de los gérmenes patógenos y producir su lisis osmótica, los productos de la activación del complemento son potentes quimiotácticos y activadores de las células inflamatorias, especialmente de los neutrófilos. La activación de la cascada del complemento es un mecanismo importante para controlar la infección bacteriana, pero, sin control, el sistema del complemento puede infligir un daño significativo a las células normales del huésped. Muchos tejidos de mamífero, incluidos los del ojo, se encuentran protegidos de la lesión mediada por complemento gracias a unas proteínas reguladoras del complemento (PRC), que se expresan en las membranas celulares y que también se encuentran presentes en los fluidos corporales, tales como el humor acuoso y el vítreo. Se ha propuesto que bajos niveles de activación del complemento son parte del proceso homeostático normal para controlar las infecciones bacterianas menores y que las PRC sirven para proteger a las células circundantes inocentes de la lesión mediada por complemento bajo dichas condiciones. En apoyo de esta hipótesis, Sohn y colaboradores han demostrado que la administración de un anticuerpo que bloquea una de las PRC —llamada regulador de superficie celular del complemento (Crry)— ocasiona una uveítis anterior severa en ratas (5). Sin embargo, la uveítis que tiene lugar en los animales tratados con anti-Crry puede ser revertida mediante la depleción de los depósitos sistémicos del complemento con el factor del veneno de cobra. Se podría discutir si desbaratar la función de las PRC mediante la administración de un anticuerpo contra una PRC (como la Crry) es análogo a la alteración en la regulación del complemento que ocurre cuando la función de una PRC clave, el factor H del complemento, se altera por la sustitución de un solo aminoácido. La fuerte asociación entre el polimorfismo del factor H y la DMAE sugiere que una regulación estricta del sistema inmune del ojo es crucial para mantener una visión normal. Esto conlleva importantes implicaciones en el contexto del privilegio ocular inmune y su impacto en la integridad del eje visual.

El privilegio inmune del ojo es un concepto ampliamente reconocido, pero frecuentemente malentendido. Expresado en sus términos más simples, el privilegio inmune es la situación en la que los procesos inmunes son o bien excluidos o bien significativamente suavizados en puntos anatómicos específicos del cuerpo. La cámara anterior del ojo es un ejemplo demostrado de privilegio inmune. Dicho privilegio inmune de la cámara anterior del ojo fue reconocido hace casi 125 años cuando el científico holandés van Dooremaal observó la supervivencia prolongada de las células tumorales humanas y de los injertos de cartílago fetal trasplantados al interior de la cámara anterior del ojo de conejo. Desde entonces, numerosos investigadores han confirmado el privilegio inmune ocular a través de la supervivencia a largo plazo de los injertos de tejido no histocompatible colocados en la cámara anterior de animales de laboratorio.

Este año marca el 100º aniversario del primer trasplante corneal humano, que fue realizado antes de conocerse el complejo mayor de histocompatibilidad humano y antes de que los corticosteroides estuvieran disponibles en oftalmología. A pesar de estas dificultades, los trasplantes corneales han tenido un enorme éxito; son beneficiarios del privilegio inmune ocular.

El privilegio inmune del ojo es la suma de las adaptaciones anatómica, fisiológica e inmunológica que de forma conjunta excluyen, regulan a la baja, neutralizan o eliminan los elementos efectores inmunitarios que pueden dañar los tejidos oculares, que tienen capacidad regenerativa limitada. Aunque el privilegio inmune fue descubierto a través de manipulaciones de laboratorio, su importancia reside en su impacto en la protección del ojo frente a la inflamación mediada por inmunidad. A diferencia de otros órganos, que pueden tolerar la inflamación y mantener una función normal, la inflamación en el ojo puede tener consecuencias devastadoras. En el análisis final, el ojo tiene sólo una función conocida: promover la transmisión sin restricciones de las imágenes de luz a la retina y liberar señales neurológicas al cerebro. El descubrimiento reciente de que el polimorfismo del factor H del complemento se asocia a la DMAE es una evidencia más de la importancia del privilegio inmune en la preservación de la visión.

  

BIBLIOGRAFÍA

  1. Klein RJ, Zeiss C, Chew EY, Tsai JY, Sackler RS, Haynes C, et al. Complement factor H polymorphism in age-related macular degeneration. Science 2005; 308: 385-389.

  2. Edwards AO, Ritter R 3rd, Abel KJ, Manning A, Panhuysen C, Farrer LA. Complement factor H polymorphism and age-related macular degeneration. Science 2005; 308: 421-424.

  3. Haines JL, Hauser MA, Schmidt S, Scott WK, Olson LM, Gallins P, et al. Complement factor H variant increases the risk of age-related macular degeneration. Science 2005; 308: 419-421.

  4. Anderson DH, Mullins RF, Hageman GS, Johnson LV. A role for local inflammation in the formation of drusen in the aging eye. Am J Ophthalmol 2002; 134: 411-431.

  5. Sohn JH, Kaplan HJ, Suk HJ, Bora PS, Bora NS. Chronic low level complement activation within the eye is controlled by intraocular complement regulatory proteins. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2000; 41: 3492-3502.

INDICE